Category Archives: Records

The Webb Brothers – “Are you coming home for Christmas?”

We are absolutely overjoyed to be releasing the first new Webb Brothers track in 5 years! A lush, sparkly piece of harmony-filled pop, ‘Are You Coming Home For Christmas?’ is in our opinion a modern Christmas classic.

The track is available to stream from the Soundcloud window below, and is part of the ‘Christmas Joy in Full Measure’ Various Artists collection of all new Christmas songs we have delighted in assembling this year.

Buy digitally from iTunes worldwide!

CDs are available at:

Piccadilly records

Rough Trade

Norman records 

 

Christmas Joy in Full Measure OUT NOW!!!

Christmas Joy in Full Measure - Various Artists
Christmas Joy in Full Measure – Various Artists

Available to pre-order now at Norman Records, Piccadilly RecordsRough Trade, iTunes and Amazon

Hand Of Glory records asked twelve artists for an original Christmas song. Here are twelve tracks that sum up the many experiences of Christmas, from lush widescreen pop (Webb Brothers), to sparkly Saturnalian disco (Mary Epworth) to dystopian Fall-esque horror (Extradition Order). Other standout tracks include Young Knives’ dark medieval-esque ‘Low Carol’, Kiran Leonard’s sprawling proggy epic ‘Huygens probe’ and Papernut Cambridge’s charming and magical ’93 Million And One’.

Hand Of Glory Presents – Christmas Joy In Full Measure

 

Christmas Joy In Full Measure
Christmas Joy In Full Measure

Available to pre-order now at Norman Records, Piccadilly RecordsRough Trade, iTunes and Amazon

Hand Of Glory records asked twelve artists for an original Christmas song. Here are twelve tracks that sum up the many experiences of Christmas, from lush widescreen pop (Webb Brothers), to sparkly Saturnalian disco (Mary Epworth) to dystopian Fall-esque horror (Extradition Order). Other standout tracks include Young Knives’ dark medieval-esque ‘Low Carol’, Kiran Leonard’s sprawling proggy epic ‘Huygens probe’ and Papernut Cambridge’s charming and magical ’93 Million And One’.

Kiran Leonard – Dear Lincoln on Pitchfork

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/15455-kiran-leonard-dear-lincoln/

“In the Bandcamp introduction to “Dear Lincoln”, Kiran Leonard lays out some caveats for prospective listeners: “I was 14 and uneducated, hence my mispronunciation (and pretentious namedropping) of friedrich NEECHsher. i also fucked up lEETmotif. but as far as anyone is concerned, the mistakes are obviously ironic.” His insistence upon irony is the only faintly juvenile thing about this majestic, freakishly savant-ish song; Leonard is now 17, and resides in Oldham, near Manchester, and as a resident thereof, I feel entirely justified in telling you just how dull it is here. Conversely, “Dear Lincoln” is a wondrous, sub-two-minute blast of shambolic, lo-fi piano rambling and smashed cymbal fog that would have been entirely at home on Elephant 6 in its heyday, recalling early of Montreal, Elf Power– and a Joanna Newsom-like way with words and intonation rendered in the wiry voice of a manic teenage boy.

Leonard says the song’s about mental health and the concept of tabula rasa, though it’s hard to follow the lyrics without guidance– he sings as if playing the piano from Big, sprinting up and down the keys while yelping at least one word for every note. There’s so much raw, unadulterated delight here; the way he uses a single word as the join between bars, breaking it over his knee before scurrying into another mad verse, spewing lines like, “the walls of coffin beds begin to topple with flames, scream names,” in some nameless panic. It is without a doubt the most invigorating song I’ve heard all year. One more time: he wrote it when he was 14 years old.”

Laura Snapes, Pitchfork

British Rock and Roll

There’s something really appealing to me about Rock and Roll as interpreted in Britain.

The often slightly more ‘showbiz’ and big band aspects to the arrangements add a campy and delirious sense of fun that is quite different to the US originators.

That said- Britain could and did rock with the best of them, despite perceived wisdom to the contrary.

Big Fat Mama: Roy Young- this has it all! Screaming vocal, big band slumming it, a pleasingly distorted production, and of course, the obligatory girly bvs. Enjoy!

Here’s a Johnny Kidd B-side from ’61 that even more epitomises the ‘arranged’ side of UK RnR without compromising the excitement for a minute.

Obviously ‘Shakin all Over’ is rightfully considered a classic, but pretty much all his singles have at least one highly worthy side, and this is my favourite.

Up next is Eden Kane’s ‘New Kind of Lovin’, proving even the often dismissed early sixties pop puppets had something to offer.

This was on the flip of his biggest hit, and is therefore a super common 50p single just about everywhere.

I love the tone of his voice. Even on the ‘pop’ A-side ‘forget me not’ he sounds not too far from the slack jawed warble of Phil May.

Dave Carey led Jazz groups from the drums in the fifties, and had a couple of novelty records on Philips before joining their A&R department and working with Kaleidoscope, amongst others. The most common of his Philips single is the truly awful ‘Bingo’, but after that came this facemelter- ‘Drum Beat’.

An actual video now. Lonnie Donegan isn’t a name that would necessarily spring to my mind as a purveyor of acoustic guitar shredding, but check this out.

Also notice the great musicianship of his band. There’s definitely more ‘schooling’ gone on here than you’d expect given the relative simplicity of the song structures, but when the band gets to solo…check out the drums!

I love the way the guitarist unleashes some super technical playing with just a ‘yep, I know’ smirk…just awesome.

 

One more for now- Derry Hart and the Hartbeats- come on baby

For me this is the perfect blend of showbiz and pounding.

Even though there’s a horn section, this doesn’t sound like the hipsters on a Little Richard record…there’s something strangely formal about the playing.

Similarly with Derry Harts vocal- even though he’s screaming in the best Little Richard style, theres something pleasingly…West Country(?) to his accent.

A great record, and of course, another B-side.

If you’ve enjoyed these tracks, there are a fair few comps of this stuff about, and with the inherent snobbery surrounding UK Rock and Roll, plus the relative obscurity (or overlooked plentifulness) the original records won’t often stretch to wallet hurting prices.